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General

How Does Your Macon, GA Heating & AC System Work?

Published on: February 22, 2012

Most heating and air conditioner owners in Macon, GA are unaware of how their system works to keep the temperature steady and the air comfortable. The HVAC system can be thought of like a circulatory system. The thermostat is the brain that controls heating or cooling. A programmable thermostat has multiple settings that allow the owner greater flexibility with temperature control.

 

Air inside the house is drawn into the heating and air conditioning system. Inside the system, the air is heated or cooled, dehumidified and returned via the ducting system. The ducts should be inspected and cleaned yearly. This removes dust and other allergens that may grow inside. The insulation should be sealed to keep air and moisture from escaping into the attic space. In Macon, GA, moist air escaping into the attic causes damage.

 

The moisture removed from the air drains outside the house via a drain tube. A cup of bleach poured into the drain every month prevents algae from growing inside and blocking the tube. A blocked tube causes the water to back up into the heating and air conditioning system. This can cause thousands of dollars of damage to the system and the house. Many homeowners in Macon, GA can plan landscaping near the drain tube outlet. This effectively hides it from view and utilizes the draining water.

 

The filter removes dust, pollen, animal dander, molds and more from the air. The conditioned and dehumidified air is cleaner and healthier. Choosing the right filter for a heating and AC system depends on the type of particles being removed, price and size. Older systems may have odd- sized filters that can be hard to find. HEPA filters are best for those with respiratory illnesses such as asthma. Electrostatic filters trap particles with static electricity. Lifetime filters can be cleaned with a garden hose and replaced in the system. There are many choices for Macon, GA homeowners.

 

The outside condensing unit is the “heart” pump of the system. It will last for decades with regular maintenance. There are many systems available on the market today with high-efficiency ratings that will save the homeowner money.